• The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament

Mass Times

Saturday Vigil
4:00pmHoly Cross
5:30pmBlessed Sacrament

Sunday
8:00amHoly Cross
9:30amBlessed Sacrament
11:00amHoly Cross

Daily Mass
Mon, Wed, Fri: 8:00amHoly Cross
Tues,Thurs: 7:30amBlessed Sacrament

Reconciliation

Saturdays
Holy Cross
3:00pm to 3:45pm

Blessed Sacrament
3:15pm to 3:45pm

Outreach Services

ServicePhone
AA Helpline1-800-640-7545
Al-Anon1-800-339-9006
Birthright of Scranton570-961-1133
National Hotline For Abortion Recovery1-866-482+5433
Rachel’s Vineyard Post Abortive Healing1-877-467-3463
PA 24 Hour Child Abuse Hot Line1-800-932-0313

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The Paschal Triduum

Christ redeemed us all and gave perfect glory to God principally through his Paschal Mystery: dying he destroyed our death and rising he restored our life. Therefore the Easter Triduum of the Passion and Resurrection of Christ is the culmination of the entire liturgical year. The Easter Triduum begins with the evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper on Holy Thursday and closes with Evening Prayer on Easter Sunday.

These days recall the central mystery of our faith: the Passion, death, and Resurrection of Christ.

From the General Norms for the Liturgical Year and the Calendar, paragraphs #18-19.

Holy Thursday

The season of Lent concludes with the celebration of the Lord’s Supper. The only Mass celebrated is in the evening when we remember Jesus’ celebration of the Passover meal. We recall that Jesus took the form of a slave and washed the feet of his disciples – giving us an example of what it means to follow Christ. Furthermore, we celebrate the institution of the Eucharist, when Jesus gave us his Body and Blood to feed us on our journey of faith. After communion, a ciborium with consecrated hosts for Good Friday is left on the altar. The Holy Eucharist then leads the procession to the Lower Chapel where the Eucharist will be reposed, reminding us of Christ’s prayer in the Garden. After the procession, the altar in the Upper Church is stripped, all candles are extinguished, and the holy water is removed from the fonts.

Good Friday

Good Friday is a celebration of Jesus’ Passion – recalling His suffering and death on the cross that He suffered for each of us. Because it is through His death that we have salvation we call the day ‘Good.’ Traditionally the Lord’s Passion is celebrated between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Based on the Gospel accounts, it is presumed that Jesus died around 3:00 p.m. Note, there is no Mass celebrated on Good Friday, rather it is a celebration of the Word which includes the veneration of the cross and distribution of Holy Eucharist which was consecrated on Holy Thursday.

Holy Saturday

The Easter Vigil is the highest celebration of the Church’s liturgical year. This is the celebration that our Lenten preparations have pointed to – both the Resurrection of Jesus and the welcoming of new members into the Church through Baptism, Confirmation, and Holy Eucharist. The Easter Vigil begins in darkness, symbolizing the darkness of the tomb. The Paschal Candle enters the church symbolizing Christ, who is the light of the world and Christ who is now risen from the dead. The light of Christ shatters the darkness and illuminates the entire Church as the Gloria is sung. The elect are baptized and confirmed after the homily.